Archive for conference

Catching Up

My desk with computers, displays, and coffee.

Whew! January was a busy month. In addition to my usual CMSWire columns (my first of the year was about the BDL role in open source), I spent time talking with journalists, working on a new research paper on Service Mesh for container clusters, and finished a paper on Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes. Busy busy busy.

At the beginning of the new year, I was quoted in a blog entitled “20 Developers and Kubernetes Experts Reveal the Biggest Mistakes People Make During the Transition to Kubernetes” It’s nice to be called a Kubernetes expert but I wouldn’t call myself that. Kelsey Hightower is an expert; I’m an observer. Still, I stand by my quote about one of the big mistakes when adopting Kubernetes which was “From our vantage as outside observers, it’s trying to apply Kubernetes to all applications.”

An article that I was previously quoted in came out in French. Originally published in mid-December as “Knative project stokes interest in event-driven IT ops” it came out in January in the French language version. I took French in high school and can still read it enough to decipher a wine bottle (shows where my priorities are) but do not speak it. I assume that “Knative : les entreprises montrent un début d’intérêt” quotes me correctly.

More talk about open source later in the month. More accurately, open core. Open core refers to companies that open source their core technology but maintain control over the project while adding “enterprise” features to the product they sell. “Uncertain future of open core software puts companies at risk” talks about the problems these companies have and the advantages of vendor supported open source.

Expect more of me in the press in the coming months.

I also completed a new research paper which compares Cloud Foundry  and Kubernetes as the basis of cloud native platforms. I dispel the myth that it must be one or the other. I expect that to be released within the next month.

And keep your eye out for a major research paper on service mesh technology. A component of microservices architectures, a service mesh is critical to enterprise container clusters and other microservices implementations. Look for it in April just ahead of Cloud Foundry Summit in Philadelphia.

And you wonder why I haven’t been blogging here much.

The Breadth and Width of Kubernetes

This blog was previously posted on Amalgam Insights

Standing in the main expo hall of KuberCon+CloudNativeCon Europe 2018 in Copenhagen, the richness of the Kubernetes ecosystem is readily apparent. There are booths everywhere, addressing all the infrastructure needs for an enterprise cluster. There are meetings everywhere for the open source projects that make up the Kubernetes and Cloud Native base of technology. The keynotes are full. What was a 500-person conference in 2012 is now, 6 years later, a 4300-person conference even though it’s not in one of the hotbeds of American technology such as San Francisco or New York City.

What is amazing is how much Kubernetes has grown in such a short amount of time. It was only a little more than a year ago that Docker released it’s Kubernetes competitor called Swarm. While Swarm still exists, Docker also supports, and arguably is betting the future, on Kubernetes.

Kubernetes came out of Google, but that doesn’t really explain why it expanded like the early universe after the big bang.  Google is not the market leader in the cloud space – it’s one of the top vendors but not the top vendor – and wouldn’t have provided enough market pull to drive the Kubernetes engine this hot. Google is also not a major enterprise infrastructure software vendor the way IBM, Microsoft, or even Red Hat and Canonical are.

Kubernetes benefited from the first mover effect. They were early into the market with container orchestration, were fully open source, and had a large amount of testing in Google’s own environment. Docker Swarm, on the other hand, was too closely tied to Docker the company to appease the open source gods.

Now, Kubernetes finds itself like a new college graduate. It’s all grown up but needs to prepare for the real world. The basics are all in place and its mature but there is enormous amount of refinement and holes that need to be filled in for it to be a common part of every enterprise software infrastructure. KubeCon+CloudNativeCon shows that this is well underway. The focus now is on security, monitoring, network improvement, and scalability. There doesn’t seem to be a lot of concern about stability or basic functionality.

Kubernetes has eaten the container world and didn’t get indigestion. That’s rare and wonderful.