Archive for big data

Microsoft Azure Plus Informatica Equals Cloud Convenience

Informatica Logo

This was originally published on June 4, 2018 on the Amalgam Insights site.

 

Two weeks ago (May 21, 2018), at Informatica World 2018, Informatica announced a new phase in its partnership with Microsoft. Slated for release in the second half of 2018, the two companies announced that Informatica’s Integration Platform as a Service, or IPaaS, would be available on Microsoft Azure as a native service. This is a different arrangement than Informatica has with other cloud vendors such as Google or Amazon AWS. In those cases, Informatica is more of an engineering partner, developing connectors for their on-premises and cloud offerings. Instead, Informatica IPaaS will be available from the Azure Portal and integrated with other Azure services, especially Azure SQLServer, Microsoft’s cloud database and Azure SQL Data Warehouse.

For Informatica customers who already use Azure, this creates great convenience. Instead of creating server instances on Azure and then installing Informatica software from scratch, customers will be able to create an IPaaS instance from the Azure portal. This allows customer to standup an IPaaS instance much faster and with less effort. Microsoft Azure customers, especially mid-market customers, who may have found an Informatica server IPaaS installation time consuming or daunting will now have an easier option too. Until now, the only way to get an Informatica installation without hand installing it was to purchase a cloud instance directly from Informatica. That would have required two different cloud relationships – Informatica for IPaaS and Microsoft for everything else. Amalgam Insights predicts that this will make Informatica IPaaS much more attractive to the existing Microsoft Azure customer base. The potential is especially high for customers who deploy SQLServer and are actively looking to move those databases to Azure SQLServer.

This partnership also provides Informatica Intelligent Cloud Services customers with a true multi-cloud option. Customers that we spoke to at Informatica World 2018 were interested in multi-cloud – many were already architecting for multi-cloud – and clearly excited by the potential to support their existing Informatica cloud offerings with an easy alternative. While the reasons companies use multi-cloud strategies vary – backup, extra capacity, segmenting architecture, or simply because of unique value in different cloud – most Informatica customers pursuing multi-cloud were excited to have another cloud option that didn’t require manual installation.

Informatica and Microsoft are natural partners. PowerBI makes for an excellent front-end for the line of business user that Informatica is pursuing. Similarly, PowerBI users need well integrated and conditioned data to create meaningful dashboards and visualizations. SQLServer is a popular data source for Informatica’s platform; Having Informatica IPaas on Azure will make the combination of Azure SQLServer and PowerBI more powerful by providing clean data from many databases as one view. This partnership is a win for both Informatica and Microsoft customers, especially their shared customers. We are looking forward to more partnerships like this with other cloud vendors in the future.

Technical Books I’m Reading

A Shelf of Technical Books

I try to keep current on technology. As weird as it may seem, to be an IT industry analyst, you don’t have to know much about technology. You can understand the market without knowing the technology that drives it. It’s limiting but possible.

To really understand IT customers – truly grok them – you need to live a bit in their world. It is my belief that understanding technology provides insights into the market.

More importantly, I like information technology, programming, and and all things geeky. It was my profession for many years before moving to the business side and my heart is still there. So, it is for myself as much as my clients and audience that I continue to go deep in technology.

I have also recently discovered Humble Bundle. They make collections of e-books, comics, and games available for a very low price and donate much of the proceeds to various charities. You can donate as little as US$1.00 and get four or five books. Check them out. They’re awesome.

Subsequently, I have been feasting on technical books on a variety of subjects. Besides my usual array of technology sites and news, here’s what I have been reading.

  • Head First Data Analysis, Michael Milton, O’Reilly – Semi-technical, accessible, introduction to the concepts of data science.
  • Doing Data Science, Cathy O’Neil and Rachel Schutt, O’Reilly – A more in-depth exploration of the process of data science.
  • Think Bayes, Allen B. Downey, O’Reilly – Tutorial on Bayesian statistics.
  • Think Stats, Allen B. Downey, O’Reilly – Tutorial on classical statistics.
  • Mastering Docker 2nd edition, Russ McKendrick and Scott Gallagher, Packt – Both introductory and advanced Docker concepts. Good starter for the budding container enthusiast.
  • Getting Started with Kubernetes, Jonathan Baier, Packt – Introduction and tutorial for Kubernetes.
  • Blockchain Basics: A Non-Technical Introduction in 25 Steps, Daniel Drescher, Packt – ntroduction to Blockchain. The non-traditional style was hard for me to get used to.
  • Mastering Blockchain, Imran Bashir, Packt – More traditional and in-depth introduction to Blockchain and major implementations of it such as Bitcoin and Ethereum. I’m reading this now.

I’ve got a lot of books coming up – I bought 41 of them for something like US$35 – including a set of Java books, and more on Cloud, Data Science, and Blockchain/Bitcoin. There’s a book on OpenStack that looks interesting. R in a Nutshell, Thoughtful Machine Learning with Python, and Java 8 Lambdas are all possibilities too. That assumes that Humble Bundle doesn’t wave something interesting in my face. I almost bought the last Python bundle but resisted. Oh, and I have a ton of Linux books waiting in the wings too.

Of course, the group above tracks my current interests. I’ve been writing code in Java since the 1990s when Java v1.0 was mostly a associated with adding applets to websites. Cloud, Containers, DevOps, Blockchain, and Data Science are top of mind for me professionally and the IT community as a whole. These books talk to the everyday work of developers which is what interests me the most.

So, I’m more than happy to settle in with a good book so long as it’s techy.